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Archive for the 'Political Ideology' Category

The Worst of the Worst

Friday, April 21st, 2006

If you haven't read Rolling Stones cover story on President George Bush (on newsstands today), The Worst President in History? I really think you should give it a read.

Personally, I'd like to be around in 100 years or so to hear how the people laugh at "that awful President from days of yore".  I just imagine people of the future being appalled that we allowed someone such as that to govern us and weren't rallying impeachment with all of our might.

Who’d of Reckoned?

Thursday, March 2nd, 2006

So the word is now that Bush and Co. knew all about the possible levee breaks, the massive damage Katrina would likely do, and a whole slew of other things they claimed - after the fact - that no one could possibly have known the scope of.

I'd like to quote our esteemed President, four days after Hurricane Katrina ravaged the southern U.S. and my home state:

I don't think anybody anticipated the breach of the levees that gushed deadly flood waters into New Orleans.

Which is very interesting, considering there is now a video showing a group of officials telling Dubya that very thing BEFORE Katrina hit. The video can be found at an article on this mess at CNN.com.

Just gives you mountains of faith in our government, now doesn't it?

Sweet Little Lies

Tuesday, September 6th, 2005

Let Bush and co. play their little game and pretend they know what's going on and that everything is now under control...the truth is out there.

How many times do you think you can lie to this country, Mr. President? How many times do you think you can cover up your failings with publicity stunts and deceptive words? How stupid do you think we are?

Coming from the hub of operations for the affected areas in Louisiana I can tell you that everything is most certainly NOT under control; that most people still don't know who *is* in control or what the hell is going on. Let him try to paint a pretty picture - he just continues to dig himself deeper as more people seek to poke holes in each of his cover-ups and lies.

[Addendum, March 2006: That link no longer seems to be working, here is an updated article on the mess.]

Open Letter To the President

Monday, September 5th, 2005

I'm so goddamned tired of all the excuses, the lies, the spinning, the slight admittance of guilt followed by a hurried "we've got it now, though". You fucked up - just admit it. There is no - NO - excuses for this, nothing you can say or do that will ever make this right. Our government failed us. Period. The best thing our administration and FEMA and all of the others' responsible can do now is to step forward and say, "Look, we messed up, big time and we're sorry." That I could respect, that I might be able to forgive - a little. But trying to make it "okay" - trying to cover it up with lies and excuses and justifications...no. You have no right.

I've no doubts in my mind that more people are dead because of our government's ineptitude than because of the hurricane. None. No matter what they get on TV and say to try and cover their asses, every single one of them has to go to sleep at night with that knowledge - they will have to bear the responsibility of thousands of innocent deaths - women and children included - on their souls.

You keep hearing them say they "didn't know" and then that they "couldn't get to them". That's amazing, considering I know people personally that made their way in with boats the day after the storm to rescue family. And how can they sit there and say they didn't know!? Everyone knew - as this article from 2002 shows - all of this was predicted. Everyone knew what would happen if a storm of this magnitude hit New Orleans, even down to the percentage of people that wouldn't or couldn't leave! I knew - without power and with only a battery-operated radio - on Tuesday (the day after the storm hit) that the Superdome had been badly damaged. Common sense then told me, with no electricity and no running water, thousands of people who've just lost everything trapped in a hot, unsanitary stadium was simply another disaster waiting to boil over. The fact is, either they knew and acted entirely too slowly, or they didn't and are simply proving to the world that they are the biggest bunch of incompetent morons to ever attempt to lead a country.

Our own government is responsible for more deaths than Katrina. That is a terrifying, and sickening thought.

I believe this open letter to President Bush, that appeared in the Times-Picayne newspaper's editorial section, reflects wonderfully how we feel:

OUR OPINIONS: An open letter to the President:

Dear Mr. President:

We heard you loud and clear Friday when you visited our devastated city and the Gulf Coast and said, "What is not working, we’re going to make it right."

Please forgive us if we wait to see proof of your promise before believing you. But we have good reason for our skepticism.

Bienville built New Orleans where he built it for one main reason: It’s accessible. The city between the Mississippi River and Lake Pontchartrain was easy to reach in 1718.

How much easier it is to access in 2005 now that there are interstates and bridges, airports and helipads, cruise ships, barges, buses and diesel-powered trucks.

Despite the city’s multiple points of entry, our nation’s bureaucrats spent days after last week’s hurricane wringing their hands, lamenting the fact that they could neither rescue the city’s stranded victims nor bring them food, water and medical supplies.

Meanwhile there were journalists, including some who work for The Times-Picayune, going in and out of the city via the Crescent City Connection. On Thursday morning, that crew saw a caravan of 13 Wal-Mart tractor trailers headed into town to bring food, water and supplies to a dying city.

Television reporters were doing live reports from downtown New Orleans streets. Harry Connick Jr. brought in some aid Thursday, and his efforts were the focus of a "Today" show story Friday morning.

Yet, the people trained to protect our nation, the people whose job it is to quickly bring in aid were absent. Those who should have been deploying troops were singing a sad song about how our city was impossible to reach.

We’re angry, Mr. President, and we’ll be angry long after our beloved city and surrounding parishes have been pumped dry. Our people deserved rescuing. Many who could have been were not. That’s to the government’s shame.

Mayor Ray Nagin did the right thing Sunday when he allowed those with no other alternative to seek shelter from the storm inside the Louisiana Superdome. We still don’t know what the death toll is, but one thing is certain: Had the Superdome not been opened, the city’s death toll would have been higher. The toll may even have been exponentially higher.

It was clear to us by late morning Monday that many people inside the Superdome would not be returning home. It should have been clear to our government, Mr. President. So why weren’t they evacuated out of the city immediately? We learned seven years ago, when Hurricane Georges threatened, that the Dome isn’t suitable as a long-term shelter. So what did state and national officials think would happen to tens of thousands of people trapped inside with no air conditioning, overflowing toilets and dwindling amounts of food, water and other essentials?

State Rep. Karen Carter was right Friday when she said the city didn’t have but two urgent needs: "Buses! And gas!" Every official at the Federal Emergency Management Agency should be fired, Director Michael Brown especially.

In a nationally televised interview Thursday night, he said his agency hadn’t known until that day that thousands of storm victims were stranded at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. He gave another nationally televised interview the next morning and said, "We’ve provided food to the people at the Convention Center so that they’ve gotten at least one, if not two meals, every single day."

Lies don’t get more bald-faced than that, Mr. President.

Yet, when you met with Mr. Brown Friday morning, you told him, "You’re doing a heck of a job."

That’s unbelievable.

There were thousands of people at the Convention Center because the riverfront is high ground. The fact that so many people had reached there on foot is proof that rescue vehicles could have gotten there, too.

We, who are from New Orleans, are no less American than those who live on the Great Plains or along the Atlantic Seaboard. We’re no less important than those from the Pacific Northwest or Appalachia. Our people deserved to be rescued.

No expense should have been spared. No excuses should have been voiced. Especially not one as preposterous as the claim that New Orleans couldn’t be reached.

Mr. President, we sincerely hope you fulfill your promise to make our beloved communities work right once again.

When you do, we will be the first to applaud.

Thoughts on “Farenheit 9/11″

Tuesday, July 6th, 2004

Time permitting (which hasn't been much as my days are now filled with "preparing for surgery"), I've been scouring the Internet for concrete rebuttals of Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11. So far, the search has been futile. The most common refutation that I've seen runs along the lines of "Michael Moore is a liar". Or "Michael Moore edits", or my personal favorite, "Michael Moore is fat" (because that explains it all, right?).

That really seems to be the only thing anyone has to say against what was brought up in Fahrenheit 9/11. Well, if it's such a bunch of bullshit lies, where's your proof to back that up? Michael Moore's level of intelligence or fat content has nothing to do with the material he presented in his movie. If you think it's so "wrong" and so "libelous", then tell me why. Show me something other than "I don't like what he said so he sucks".

The real reason I'm writing though is an alarming trend I saw throughout the "Michael Moore is poo-poo" rants; the accusation that those who liked the movie or agree with some of Moore's points, or just those that disagree with our President and his administration, are non-patriotic traitors who don't support our troops. This could possibly be the most ignorant thing I've ever read.

Exactly where is the logic in that? Because I disagree with decisions made by my government I automatically don't support anything to do with my country whatsoever? If you believe this, or you say this, then you're just being ignorant, I'm sorry.

The entire point of being an American and having freedoms like we do is so that we can disagree with our government! If I don't like what Bush is doing, I have the freedom to say that and Michael Moore has the ability to make a movie about it.

But what in the name of shit does that have to do with supporting our troops? Look, I may not support the reason they're over there, but they were sent and they are there fighting and dying every day and my heart, and my support, goes out to them. Just because I don't support the reason we're at war doesn't mean I don't support the men and women that are over there fighting! If it weren't for our troops, all the people that have lost their lives in battles and wars past, we wouldn't have the freedoms we have now! I'm well aware of that and just because I don't like our monkey-faced president sure in hell doesn't mean that I don't or can't still support our armed forces!! What does one have to do with the other? Absolutely nothing! Bush has done some pretty fucked up things wherein our environment is concerned; you don't see me yelling out that those who like Bush must therefore hate the planet! I wouldn't, because that's stupid.

It really pisses me off seeing these ignorant people throwing around such vitriol for no damn good reason. So what if I don't like President Bush?! What the fuck do you care? So everyone that doesn't like the president, or disagrees with YOUR viewpoints, is a traitor to the United States? I mean come the fuck on.

The whole thing is just utterly stupid. We can argue 'til we're blue in the face that we have a good/bad president and a good/bad administration and a just/unjust reason for going to war. Opinions are like assholes but it doesn't mean you have to act like one if someone doesn't share your viewpoint. Don't accuse people of being non-patriotic for having an opinion. Don't accuse people of hating our troops simply because we liked Fahrenheit 9/11.

Invasion Is the Right Word

Wednesday, June 30th, 2004

It's such a wonderful thing that sovereignty was returned to the Iraqis - and two days early at that! God, Allah & Bush are good. The now-free Iraqi people, who assuredly are singing our praises, can live a better life and soon, plainly, our brave troops will be able to start coming home. There are definitely a few loose ends to tie up, but now that we've supposedly taken our hands out of Iraq's oil lands, our boys and girls can start the long-awaited trip home. Right?

Apparently not, according to the headline this morning:
Army Recalling Thousands Who Left Service. And why is it that "5,600 former soldiers" are being readied to send over to the country-we're-purportedly-done-with? Could it be because terrorist activity has actually increased due to our invasion? This article from Time.com seems to say something along those lines:

(Emphasis mine)

...The IISS reported that al-Qaeda's recruitment and fundraising efforts had been given a major boost by the U.S. invasion of Iraq. It estimated that bin Laden's network today commands some 18,000 men, of which about 1,000 are currently inside Iraq. After almost three years of President Bush's war on terror, the IISS offered the following assessment of the movement's prospects: "Although half of al-Qaeda's 30 senior leaders and perhaps 2,000 rank-and-file members have been killed or captured, a rump leadership is still intact and more than 18,000 potential terrorists are still at large, with recruitment accelerating on account of Iraq...

...So why is al-Qaeda continuing to grow and prosper despite the loss of its Afghan sanctuaries and so many of its personnel, and the fact that it has been relentlessly hounded by security services across Europe, the Middle East and Southeast Asia? The consensus among security analysts is that the key to eliminating al-Qaeda as a threat is to transform the permissive political environment in which it operates in the Muslim world. Instead, the opposite has occurred — Muslim anger at the U.S. has reached an all-time high and continues to grow, driven by outrage at U.S. actions in Iraq and Afghanistan...

I mean, I can't understand why they'd hate us so. We only went in and destroyed their lives, homes, families, etc. to give them "freedom", along with an unstable and now more dangerous place to live. Because, you know, America likes to stick their nose where it doesn't belong and fight for the underdog. Who cares that we should've been going after those that caused thousands of deaths on 9/11? Those people in Iraq needed freedom - and someone had to stop those ghostly weapons of mass destruction from being completed and used! Why, we had to do something. We could concentrate on bin Laden at another time. For now, there was oil WMD & oppressed people to worry about.

If you look at the invasion of Iraq as some benign freedom-from-tyranny ploy, then I think you're missing the big picture. Now that we're "giving" them their soveriegnty, that's what everyone seems to be thinking. Even if that were the case, I have to ask "why?" Why were we worried about the Iraqi peoples' plight when we had those responsible for 9/11 to track down? Because let's face it, we all know by now that there was (even if there is now because of the war) no Iraq/al-Qaeda connection. If America was just trying to help the oppressed peoples, then I believe it overstepped its boundaries. It's like a child in a playground defending other children from a bully. That's noble, and even commendable. But if the same child showed up at school with an AK-47 and blew the bully away, that would be a different story; that would be very bad, and very wrong.

They went over there for their own selfish reasons, and now they can't pull out. The state of things since the war has made that impossible. So we're stuck there - and stuck sending 5,000+ more of our brave men and women to possible death.

Thoughts on Fahrenheit 911

Tuesday, June 29th, 2004

Not that I really care if someone disagrees with me or that what I write might offend someone - obviously I rarely worry about that - but this is a sensitive subject. That said, I'd like to point out that when we talk about what we think and how we feel we should be able to discuss those differences without getting upset that someone else might think differently. What that means is, no fighting, kids. If you want to yell at me, go right ahead - it's my blog and I'll yell right back - but no one is going to bash anyone for their opinions in the comments. Capice? So play nice.

I went to see Fahrenheit 9/11 on Sunday. I believe it's something that everyone should see - whether pro-Bush or anti-Bush. It raised some interesting questions and thoughts, and did point out some fairly irrefutable facts; things that anyone could learn about it with a bit of research (i.e. the Bush & bin Laden families being so tight, the US flying the bin Ladens out of the country a few days after 9/11, etc.)

That said, some of it, also, must be taken with a grain of salt - Moore has at his disposal the power of editing and, naturally, some of it is going to be his own opinion.

My personal feelings after viewing the movie were anger, outrage, shame and fear. And I wanted to know more. I wanted to talk to those that saw the movie and are for Bush - I wanted to hear their opinions and refutes of the claims. I'd like to hear from Bush himself and his administration - what have they to say about the claims being brought? I'd like to hear the other side of the story.

I want someone, somewhere, to tell me why we invaded Iraq. I want someone to prove to me, with actual facts, that we went over there and terrorized these people for reasons other than to line the Big Money's pockets. I want someone to tell me why, in 2000, our govm't said that Saddamn Hussein was not a threat and could not ever be a threat as we were monitoring him and had ways of stopping him from getting anything that would enable him to begin building "weapons of mass destruction".

I want someone out there to tell me how they believe the passing of the Patriot Act, and going against our own Constitution, was a good thing.

These were just my thoughts after viewing the movie. I watched innocent Iraqi civilians crying and screaming to god for help and mercy because we had destroyed their lives and homes and killed their families - I thought about why we were in Iraq - and I was ashamed to be an American. I saw the wounded young American soldiers and the mourning family of one who died - for what? - and I was ashamed to be an American. I can't get my mind around the fact that there was no reason for us to go over there. If there was, I can't seem to see it.

For me, I loved the movie. I respect anyone that uses their voice to speak out against what they believe to be wrong. Whether or not I did agree with Michael Moore isn't the issue - I respect him and his right to say what he wanted. Yes, I agreed with a lot of it and I thought it was brilliant. But even if I hadn't, I'd still give the man his props. Not many have the balls to get out there and say what's on their mind or to speak out when they feel injustice taking place. But for me, I was one of the ones applauding at the end.

I just wanted to share my thoughts after actually viewing it. I don't expect anyone to agree with me - these are my thoughts and mine alone and naturally they're not going to coincide with everyone else's. That said, I hope *my opinions* don't offend anyone; they shouldn't.